Top Menu

2015 Crate Study Results

Thank you for reviewing our 2015 Crate and Carrier Study Testing.  Please note that upon publication of the 2016 CPS Crate and Carrier Safety Standards (output from our 2015 study) we launched the CPS Certified Program where you can now find our logo on brands that meet our rigorous testing and performance requirements.  You can find those products here:  CPS Certified Program

###

In 2015 Center for Pet Safety and Subaru of America renewed a partnership with the intent to study the crashworthiness of pet travel crates that claimed “testing”, “crash testing” or “crash protection”. Only crates valued under a purchase price of $1,000.00 (cost of product plus shipping) were considered for this study.

Additionally, understanding that product cost is a purchasing factor for pet owners, CPS also performed investigative testing on “value” crates that are commonly used for pet travel to determine if they could be adapted to achieve improved structural integrity and crash protection. For this effort value crates are defined as typically costing under $150.00 and do not make claims of “testing”, “crash testing” or “crash protection”. Plastic Crates have been defined as “Carriers” and that summary report can be found here.

The purpose of the 2015 Crate Study is:

  • Independently evaluate the current-state travel crate products that claim “testing”, “crash testing” or “crash protection” and cost less than $1,000.00 (US).
  • Examine the safety, structural integrity and crashworthiness of “value” crates. • Examine connection options to help educate pet owners.
  • Collect performance data necessary to support a formal test protocol and ratings guidelines for pet travel crates.
  • Determine top performing crate brand(s).

Download the 2015 Crate Crashworthiness Study Summary Report (pdf) here.

View the 2015 Carrier Study Results.

If this information has been helpful to you, please consider a donation so we can further our research to help you protect your pet.

Product Selection for the 2015 Crate Study

Investigative Testing:

Test V15572 Gunner Kennel

top_performer_2015_crate_study-Gunner-01Test Dog Size: 75#
Connection Notations: Centrally Located; Gunner Reinforced Connection Straps

A connection kit (4 anchor straps included in the kit) was purchased with the Gunner Kennel and was used to secure the crate to the connections in the simulated cargo area per manufacturer instructions.

Test Results: The anchor straps held firmly with no hardware deformation or webbing migration. The anchor pins on the crate experienced minor deformation.

The Gunner Kennel did not strike the seatback.

The kennel experienced no structural integrity issues with the overall crate body. The locked door retained integrity and was unlocked and opened easily.

The crash test dog was retained.

The test results from the first test of the Gunner Kennel were superior and a second test was deemed “not necessary” by Center for Pet Safety.

Gunner Kennels G1 Intermediate with 8′ Tie Down Straps was named 2015 Top Performing Crate

V15572 from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

 

V15572-OB Gunner Kennel – OnBoard View:

V15572-OB from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

 

V15572-OH Gunner Kennel – Overhead View:

V15572 OVERHEAD from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

Test V15573 4Pets Proline Milan

Test Dog Size: 75#
Connection Notations: Centrally Located; Manufacturer supplied connection straps

Two anchor straps, included with the ProLine Milan, were used to secure the crate to the connections in the simulated cargo area.

Test Results: The cargo connection anchor straps experienced a complete rupture and fully released the crate.

The rear panel of the crate was destroyed. The rear end of the test dog protruded out of the crate. The rear and side panels of the crate were confirmed to be wooden chip board.

The lock failed and the door of the crate released inwards toward the test dog upon impact. The crate subsequently tumbled in free flight off of the test sled and onto the floor.

The door could not be opened and required extra force to open and release the test dog.

V15573 from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

V15573-OB 4Pets Proline – OnBoard View:

V15573-OB from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

V15573-OB 4Pets Proline – Overhead View:

V15573 OVERHEAD from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

Test V15575 4Pets Proline Milan

Test Dog Size: 75#
Connection Notations: Against Seatback, Manufacturer supplied connection straps

Two anchor straps are included with the ProLine Milan were used to secure the crate to a single connection point in the simulated cargo area and around the simulated seat fixture.

Test Results: With the support of the simulated seat fixture, the Proline Milan crate experienced minor damage to the back wooden panel.

The lock failed and the door of the crate released inwards toward the test dog upon impact.

The door could not be opened. Additional tools, including a small crow bar, were used to pry the door open and release the test dog.

The crate remained in position and tethered to the seatback fixture. The crash test dog was contained by the crate.

V15575 from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

V15575-OB 4Pets Proline – OnBoard View:

V15575-OB from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

V15575-OB 4Pets Proline – Overhead View:

V15575 OVERHEAD from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

Test V15574 MIM Variocage

Test Dog Size: 75#
Connection Notations: Against Seatback, Manufacturer supplied connection straps

Two anchor straps, included with the MIM Variocage, were used to secure the crate to the connections in the simulated cargo area.

Test Results: The front cargo connection failed – the front cargo strap remained intact, however it tore through the metal connection point on the crate.

The rear cargo connection failed and the webbing ruptured.

The crate crushed (as noted in the marketing material) during impact with an average crush of 10 inches. The top and sides of the crate experienced minor deformation.

The locked door retained integrity and was unlocked and opened easily. The crash test dog was retained.

V15574 from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

V15574-OB Variocage – OnBoard View:

V15574- OB from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

V15574-OH Variocage – Overhead View:

V15574 OVERHEAD from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

Test V15576 Variocage

Test Dog Size: 75#
Connection Notations: Against Seatback, Manufacturer supplied connection straps

Two anchor straps, included with the MIM Variocage, were used to secure the crate to the connections in the simulated cargo area.

Test Results: The front cargo connection failed – the front cargo strap remained intact, however it tore through the metal connection point on the crate.

The crate crushed (as noted in the marketing material) during impact with an average crush of 10 inches. The top and sides of the crate experienced minor deformation.

The locked door retained integrity and was unlocked and opened easily. The crash test dog was retained.

V15576 from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

V15576-OB Variocage – OnBoard View:

V15576-OB from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

V15576-OH Variocage – Overhead View:

V15576 OVERHEAD from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

Test V15577 Ruff Tuff

Test Dog Size: 75#
Connection Notations: Centrally located, Manufacturer connections, CPS Supplied Strength Rated Connection Straps.

Center for Pet Safety used four new strength-rated cargo straps connected to the crate connectors and the anchors in the simulated cargo area to anchor the crate.

Test Results: The tie-down brackets failed on three of four corners.

The door of the crate completely separated from the crate and broke into multiple pieces.

The crate body itself sustained minimal deformation at the point of impact. No fracture of the crate body occurred.

The crate contacted the seatback fixture and the test dog was not retained in the crate.

V15577 from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

V15577-OB Ruff Tuff – OnBoard View:

V15577-OB from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

V15577-OH Ruff Tuff – Overhead View:

V15577 OVERHEAD from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

Test V15702 Ruff Tuff

Test Dog Size: 75#
Connection Notations: Against Seatback, Manufacturer connections, CPS Supplied Strength Rated Connection Straps.

Center for Pet Safety used four new strength-rated cargo straps connected to the crate connectors and the anchors in the simulated cargo area to anchor the crate.

Test Results: The tie-down brackets retained integrity.

The crate body itself sustained minimal deformation at the point of impact. No fracture of the crate body occurred.

The test dog impacted the front door of the crate causing a section of the door to break, however the test dog was retained.

V15702 from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

V15702-OB Ruff Tuff – OnBoard View:

V15702 – OB from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

V15702-OH Ruff Tuff – Overhead View:

V15702 OVERHEAD from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

Test V15570 Midwest Wire Kennel with Rubber Anchor Straps

Test Dog Size: 110#
Connection Notations: Centrally Located; Rubber Straps x 4

The wire crate was anchored by popular rubber straps (purchased from the local Lowes).

Test Results: The wire crate slid forward directly into the seatback fixture. The crate was severely deformed on impact. The rubber straps fail to provide any protection to the crate, the dog or the human passengers in the case of an accident.

V15570 from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

V15570-OH Midwest Wire Kennel – Overhead View:

V15570 OVERHEAD from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

Test V15571 Midwest Wire Kennel with Reinforced Cage Support System

Test Dog Size: 110#
Connection Notations: Centrally Located; Reinforced Straps

Center for Pet Safety designed a reinforcing system made up of a number of strength rated straps. The purpose of this test was to see if there was any logical way to make a “value” crate perform better in a crash test.

Test Results: The wire crate remained in the cargo area and did not strike the seatback.

The test dog hit the back of the crate thus causing the crate to fail and the crash test dog struck the seatback. The crate was severely deformed on impact.

Test evidence indicates that even with strength rated support systems, wire crates should be considered as distraction prevention tools and will not provide significant protection in the case of an accident.

V15571 from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.

V15571-OH Midwest Wire Kennel – Overhead View:

V15571 OVERHEAD from Center for Pet Safety on Vimeo.